Thanks everyone for making our first class upbeat and entertaining. I am looking forward to what is ahead of us. 
I hope you enjoyed the video "The Photographers."  Please voice your opinion on what images stuck out for you and why. What made the images in the video successful.
 


Kim Avila
01/11/2011 04:35

The picture of the girl/women that ended up on the cover of the magazine. Her eyes where pierceing. I think they movie called them "ghost like" That was a great picture.

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Susan Cohen
01/11/2011 06:59

That image was taken by a photographer named Steve McCurry, a staff photographer for the Geo. The image was shot in 1985. He went back to look for the girl, now a woman, 17 years later and found her. I have a video on this, if we find time I may bring in.

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Brandon Lukens
01/11/2011 12:11

The photos that stuck out the most to me were the underwater photographs. Not only did he have so much to prepare for before he could even go down underwater, but also the amount of danger he was putting himself into to get the photos. But once he got down there he got to take pictures of things most of us will probably never see in our life. The ability to capture unknown worlds and share it with the rest of us stuck out to me. And also catching the creatures in their natural environment was amazing as well. Being able to blend in and catch them in everyday life is so hard to ever get whether its on land or on the sea.

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Jimmie Breedlove
01/11/2011 13:51

I liked the guy waiting for the right moment of the old lady in the market. I have some pix that I took in Egypt of some poor egyptian begging for food from us tourist at a rest stop on our way to Cairo. I get them developed and share with the class.

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Jene' Robinson
01/11/2011 13:58

Some of the images that stuck out to me the most were of the Muslim women. Muslim women of the Middle East have little freedoms and could seriously get in trouble for having their picture with out the permission of the male of the household. But what make them so captivating is although they are covered from head to toe in their hijab (traditional covering) and only part of their body that’s showing are their eyes they still portray feminine attractiveness through their posture and body language. Could you imagine having to cover your entire body ever day and not having the freedom to express yourself?? To be able to capture these women on film as well as capture their feminine essence is what make the photos great to me.

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Jene' Robinson
01/11/2011 14:00

Some of the images that stuck out to me the most were of the Muslim women. Muslim women of the Middle East have little freedoms and could seriously get in trouble for having their picture with out the permission of the male of the household. But what make them so captivating is although they are covered from head to toe in their hijab (traditional covering) and only part of their body that’s showing are their eyes they still portray feminine attractiveness through their posture and body language. Could you imagine having to cover your entire body ever day and not having the freedom to express yourself?? To be able to capture these women on film as well as capture their feminine essence is what make the photos great to me.

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Susan Cohen
01/11/2011 14:20

Former Geo photographer Jodi Cobb has an amazing collection of work and it would be well worth it to continue to look at her work. She is the photographer who photographed the Muslim woman and children on the swing. Enjoy the journey.

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Steffi Powers
01/11/2011 15:21

Susan,
Thank you for a wonderful class last night. I would have a hard time picking a favorite photo from the film you showed us last night but, for me personally I learned so much about how incredible the work is that goes into capturing that one perfect moment. I look forward to this class and thank you again.
Steffi

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Jenny Smith
01/11/2011 16:48

The pictures of the starving people/children in Africa, I don't know that they were my most favorite photos but it was the most moving photos. I was taken there, a place I know nothing about was brought into my own little world because of these photos and the photographers willing to go there to capture it for me and the rest of the world to see. Heart breaking but powerful.

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Amber Taney
01/11/2011 17:20

Yes, thank you Susan for a wonderful first class last night. The images that stuck out the most to me were the skeletons frozen in time from Mount Vesuvius. The video of what was happening while the photographer was taking the photos was not too impressive to me but when the photos were developed, the horrific scene of death and destruction was truly reveled. The photographer captured the pain and fright that cemented onto their bodies, it was chilling to feel the effects hundreds of years later. That was a picture that told its story and left the viewer wanting more. I hope that one day after I am a trained photographer, I can capture the same intensity through my lens.

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Tyson Hill
01/11/2011 21:13

There were several photos that stood out to me. What I really enjoyed was seeing what the photographer went through just as far as travel and putting your self in depressing or dangerous situations to get a single shot. That takes a lot of dedication. I also liked how each pic had so much emotions and you could almost tell the story just by looking at them.

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Susan Cohen
01/11/2011 21:42

Bravo Tyson: you hit it dead on. A strong image will tell a story without direction or description. We will continue to investigate this idea throughout the session. Add in Amber's idea of leave them wanting more, and it sounds like a recipe that takes us beyond a simple snapshot.
Susan

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Katelynd Rupe
01/12/2011 10:06

I loved seeing all the bright, vibrant colors in the photos of "National Geographic". That's what helped me remember the photos and what helped make them stick out to me, personally. I think a very important part of making a memorable photo is making you feel like you were there when that photo was taken. It isn't easy to capture a moment with one click, but somehow these professionals seem to manage just fine.

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Cathrine Richards
01/12/2011 11:28

I loved the class on Monday. Photography is an extra eye for the world to look through and "National Geographic" has always been my most favorite magazine to look at, if fact I don't tend to read the articles as much as looking at the pictures. I feel through art, emotions, some of which I still don't understand.
It use to be that you had to be in the right place at the right time when taking film, now you just need a computer and too many are using the computer to distort reality. The art of photography is still important to those who remember how it use to be, unfortunately we are getting fewer as we grow older. Thank you for the great intro to your class, I look forward to a great semester.

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Cathrine Richards
01/12/2011 11:33

I forgot to express my feelings about the photo or photos the specifically touched me. I loved the personal application that the photographer went with the Muslim women and the photos from Africa: the painstaking way they went to get the photo. I loved all the photographs actually.

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Milo Welch
01/12/2011 12:30

What stuck out to me in the video was the work and time that the photographer living in Africa went through to get the lions used to her spotlight so that she would be able to photograph them doing things naturally. The dedication that she put into that wasn't so much 'right time, right place' but instead 'always be there and maybe something will happen', which would take a lot of patience waiting for that opportunity.

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Adna Gazic
01/12/2011 14:26

The image that stuck out to me was the 1985 cover “Afghan Girl” taken by Steve McCurry. What drew me to this image were her eyes. It was not only the sea green color of them, but also the expression. They are piercing, burning with ferocity, filled with anger, and they are haunting. The use of color, light, and angle in the image is fantastic as well.

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